Speakers

The language used in the biographies reflects the language of the presented session.

Emily Banzet, Manager of Communications and Marketing at SAC

Emily Banzet is the Manager of Communications and Marketing at Speech-Language & Audiology Canada (SAC). Prior to joining SAC, Emily worked for 10 years on Parliament Hill in various communication roles, including as a Media Relations Officer for the Office of the Prime Minister and as the Director of Communications for the Minister of State for Western Economic Diversification. This experience makes Emily well suited to help professionals understand how best to tailor their message to a wide variety of audiences, including key decision-makers.

Advocacy & Audiology: How Can You Be a Change-Maker?

Friday 05/10

10:45 am - 12:15 pm

Jamie M. Bogle, AuD, PhD

Jamie M. Bogle, is an assistant professor of Audiology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science and is the Chair of Audiology at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona.  Dr. Bogle evaluates children and adults with dizziness and imbalance due to peripheral and central conditions.

 

I Don’t Have a Vestibular Laboratory – What Can I Do to Evaluate a Patient With Dizziness and Imbalance?

Friday 05/10

9:30 am - 12:15 pm

Matthew Bromwich, B.Sc., M.Sc. Candidate, MD, FRCSC

Dr. Matthew Bromwich is a full-time surgeon at CHEO and an associate professor of otolaryngology at the University of Ottawa. He is the physician lead for the CHEO innovation program HIP613. Dr. Bromwich is the inventor of several medical devices and holds four patents. In 2005, he founded Clearwater, an organization that develops and distributes medical devices worldwide. He aims to democratize access to medical care by delivering innovative and inexpensive solutions. Dr. Bromwich has published 28 papers and four book chapters on otolaryngology and has held more than 10.7 million dollars of grant, research and investment funds. In 2014 he won the national “TELUS Award for mHealth Innovation”.  In 2016 he was nominated for the E&Y Entrepreneur of the Year award and he and his team won the 2016 Interface Health Challenge for their work on mobile hearing testing. He won the David E Mitchel prize at the 2018 Manning Innovation Awards.

Population-based Screening: How Can We Bridge the Hearing Gap with Hard-to-Reach Groups?

Saturday 05/11

9:00 am - 10:00 am

Duncan Floyd, M.Sc., Aud(C)

Duncan Floyd graduated from Dalhousie University in 1996 and since that time has practiced audiology in three countries. He has worked with children and adults in both public and private settings.  Duncan was the clinical coordinator for audiology at Dalhousie University from 2006 to 2017.  He is currently a lecturer at Dalhousie University on acoustic immittance testing, works clinically in an ENT setting, and is the co-owner of a business called Accessible Hearing Solutions.  Duncan has co-authored several research publications on middle ear analysis and has served on various national and provincial committees.

Accessible Participation: How Can Audiologists Expand Rehab into the Community?

Friday 05/10

1:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Christian Giguère, PhD

Christian Giguère has been a professor in the Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Program at the University of Ottawa since 1995. His primary research interests include speech communication and testing, advanced hearing protection technology, occupational hearing and auditory fitness for duty. Professor Giguère is active in the area of standardization with several organizations, including CSA Group, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).  

Population-based Screening: How Can We Bridge the Hearing Gap with Hard-to-Reach Groups?

Saturday 05/11

9:00 am - 10:00 am

Jennifer Gonzalez, AuD, PhD, CCC-A, FAAA

Jennifer Gonzalez is a clinical assistant professor in audiology at Arizona State University. Her research and clinical expertise focuses on advanced vestibular diagnostics and rehabilitation, central auditory processing disorders and auditory evoked responses, including auditory brainstem response, middle latency response and cortical auditory evoked potentials.

Effects of Concussion on Vestibular and Central Auditory Processing Function: How Can We Use Past and Current Knowledge to Shape Future Diagnostic and Rehabilitation Techniques?

Saturday 05/11

9:00 am - 10:00 am

Dave Gordey, PhD, Aud(C)

Dave Gordey is the Director of Clinical Research and Professional Relations for Oticon and is the President of the Canadian Academy of Audiology (2018/2019). Dave’s research interests include pediatric hearing devices, unilateral hearing loss, the social development of children with hearing loss, as well as knowledge translation and implementation science in pediatric audiology.

 

The Future of Pediatric Audiology: How can Knowledge Translation and Implementation Science Inform our Clinical Practice?

Saturday 05/11

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Gyl Kasewurm, AuD

Dr. Gyl Kasewurm has owned and operated Professional Hearing Services (PHS) in Saint Joseph, Michigan for more than thirty years. Kasewurm’s single-office practice generates ten times the annual revenue of an average practice. She earned her Doctorate in Audiology from Central Michigan University. Dr. Kasewurm has received many awards and honors, including a Distinguished Achievement Award from the American Academy of Audiology, but she is proudest of the Leadership Award, which was bestowed upon her by her local Chamber of Commerce. Dr. Kasewurm was recently honoured by Western Michigan University as a Distinguished Alumnus, an honour awarded to only 99 of the more than 17,000 graduates of the College of Health and Human Services. She is a well-known author and sought after speaker and prides herself on her advice for taking a practice from “fine to fabulous!”
 

How Can Marketing Tools Help Chart a Path Through The Ever-Changing Landscape of Audiology?

Friday 05/10

1:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids and Personal Sound Amplification Products: How Can Canadian Audiologists Prepare for the Future?

Friday 05/10

9:30 am - 10:30 am

Josée Lagacé, PhD

Josée Lagacé is an associate professor in the Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Program at the University of Ottawa. Her main research interests include a better understanding of the speech perception difficulties in noisy environments, as well as the design of more effective and evidence-based evaluation tools for these hearing difficulties and related rehabilitation strategies.

Population-based Screening: How Can We Bridge the Hearing Gap with Hard-to-Reach Groups?

Saturday 05/11

9:00 am - 10:00 am

Ariane Laplante-Lévesque, PhD, Aud(C)

Hearing healthcare research that makes a difference is the passion of Ariane Laplante-Lévesque. She is a researcher and communicator for Oticon Medical in Denmark and is an associate professor at Linköping University in Sweden. Ariane trained as a clinical audiologist in Montreal and completed her PhD in Australia. Her interests include eHealth and evidence-based practice and policy. Ariane has published over 45 influential peer-reviewed publications and is currently an associate editor of the International Journal of Audiology.

 

Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids and Personal Sound Amplification Products: How Can Canadian Audiologists Prepare for the Future?

Friday 05/10

9:30 am - 10:30 am

Chantal Laroche, PhD, Member of OOAQ and OAO

Chantal Laroche is a professor in the audiology and speech-language pathology program at the University of Ottawa. Her research interests include the effects of noise on health, noise and communication, functional hearing assessment, the perception of warning signals and the prevention of noise-induced hearing loss.

Accessible Participation: How Can Audiologists Expand Rehab into the Community?

Friday 05/10

1:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Karen Li, PhD

Karen Li completed her doctoral studies in cognitive aging and working memory in 1996 at the University of Toronto, followed by post-doctoral fellowships at Duke University and the Max Planck Institute for Lifespan Development from 1997 to 2000. She joined the psychology department at Concordia University in 2000 and is presently a full-time professor of psychology, with a research focus on cognitive aging and the role of executive functions in gait and posture. 

Karen directs the Laboratory for Adult Development and Cognitive Aging and has received funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Foundation for Innovation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council and Fonds de recherche du Québec, Société et Culture. She is also a researcher of the PERFORM Centre for preventative health research and of the Centre for Research in Human Development, as well as the engAGE Centre for Research on Aging.

Hearing Loss and Comorbidities in Aging: How Will Emerging Evidence Influence Future Best Practice in Audiology?

Saturday 05/11

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Paul Mick, PhD

Dr. Paul Mick is a neurotologist and clinical associate professor at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. His research focuses on understanding the epidemiology of age-related hearing loss and interventions that aim to reduce its impact on public health.

Population-based Screening: How Can We Bridge the Hearing Gap with Hard-to-Reach Groups?

Saturday 05/11

9:00 am - 10:00 am

Hearing Loss and Comorbidities in Aging: How Will Emerging Evidence Influence Future Best Practice in Audiology?

Saturday 05/11

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Dr. Terence Miranda, AuD, RAUD, RHIP

Terence is a registered audiologist and the founder of Resonance Hearing Clinic, which has four offices on Vancouver Island. He earned his B.Sc. in engineering from Queen’s University in 1994 and worked as a reservoir engineer with Imperial Oil before finding his true calling as an audiologist. He graduated with his M.Sc. in audiology from the University of British Columbia in 2000 and his Doctorate in Audiology from the PCO School of Audiology (now Salus University) in 2008. 

 

Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids and Personal Sound Amplification Products: How Can Canadian Audiologists Prepare for the Future?

Friday 05/10

9:30 am - 10:30 am

Nancy Newall, B.Sc., MA, PhD

Nancy Newall is an assistant professor in psychology at Brandon University and is a research affiliate with the Centre on Aging at the University of Manitoba. Her work has examined some of the causes of loneliness as well as the consequences of loneliness for older Manitobans in terms of health and longevity. Ms. Newall has also been involved in projects relating to the Age-Friendly Manitoba initiative. Most recently, she has turned her attention to exploring what types of services or interventions can help people become less lonely or isolated and more socially connected.

Accessible Participation: How Can Audiologists Expand Rehab into the Community?

Friday 05/10

1:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Natalie Phillips, PhD

Dr. Natalie Phillips is a professor in the Department of Psychology at Concordia University. She examines the neuropsychology of healthy aging and Alzheimer’s disease, using clinical and experimental tasks and measures of electrical brain activity (EEG/ERP). Natalie’s current research interests include sensory-cognitive interactions and speech and language processing in older adults, including those who are bilingual. She is one of the principal developers of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), a cognitive screening instrument used globally for the assessment of mild cognitive impairment. She is also the academic lead neuropsychologist for the COMPASS-ND study in the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA) and is the founding leader of CCNA Team 17, which examines sensory decline and cognitive function in persons with dementia.

Hearing Loss and Comorbidities in Aging: How Will Emerging Evidence Influence Future Best Practice in Audiology?

Saturday 05/11

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Kathy Pichora-Fuller, PhD

Kathy Pichora-Fuller is a full professor of psychology at the University of Toronto. Previously, she taught audiology at the University of British Columbia. She combines clinical experience in rehabilitative audiology with experimental psychology and has earned an international reputation for her interdisciplinary approach to linking research on auditory and cognitive processing during communication in everyday life. Her recent research focuses on sensory-cognitive-social links to promote optimal aging. She co-chaired the 2016 World Congress of Audiology in Vancouver. She is the audiology expert on the Canadian Longitudinal Study of Aging and the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging.

Hearing Loss and Comorbidities in Aging: How Will Emerging Evidence Influence Future Best Practice in Audiology?

Saturday 05/11

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Audra Renyi, B.Sc.

Audra Renyi is the Executive Director of World Wide Hearing and the founder of earAccess. Ms. Renyi has worked in finance on Wall Street and with NGOs in Rwanda, Chad and Kenya. She holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Pennsylvania and has completed the executive leadership program at Harvard Business School. Ms. Renyi has won the Governor General of Canada's Innovation Award and was named a Heroine of Health at the 2018 WHO World Health Assembly.  

Population-based Screening: How Can We Bridge the Hearing Gap with Hard-to-Reach Groups?

Saturday 05/11

9:00 am - 10:00 am

Pasqualina (Lina) Santaguida, PhD, PT

Pasqualina Santaguida is an assistant professor at McMaster University in the department of Health Research Methods, Impact and Evidence. She is also an associate member in the School of Rehabilitation Sciences. Lina was co-associate director of the McMaster University Evidence-based Practice (EBP) Centre for 10 years and has taught principles of EBP for 16 years.

Hearing Loss and Comorbidities in Aging: How Will Emerging Evidence Influence Future Best Practice in Audiology?

Saturday 05/11

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Susan Stanton, PhD

Susan Stanton is an associate professor at the National Centre for Audiology at Western University. Trained as a clinical audiologist and neuroscientist, she has explored how environmental factors and genes affect the inner ear and central auditory system. Her current research focuses on advanced phenotyping of individuals and families with genetic forms of hearing loss.

Audiology in the 21st century: How Will Genomics Impact the Future of Hearing Healthcare?

Saturday 05/11

9:00 am - 10:00 am

Christopher T. Sutton, MBA

Christopher T. Sutton is the National Executive Director of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association. Mr. Sutton’s career has spanned across the non-profit, private and public sectors in both the United States and Canada, where he has worked in various leadership capacities for some of the largest organizations serving people with disabilities.

Mr. Sutton holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Gallaudet University, a Masters in Business Administration from the Ivey Business School at the University of Western Ontario, in addition to a number of professional certifications. 

Accessible Participation: How Can Audiologists Expand Rehab into the Community?

Friday 05/10

1:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Dr. Walter Wittich, PhD, FAAO, CLVT

Dr. Walter Wittich is an assistant professor at the École d’optométrie at the Université de Montréal. Coming from a background in age-related vision loss, he now conducts research in dual sensory impairment and deaf-blindness. His research domains include basic sensory science, as well as medical, psychosocial and rehabilitation approaches to sensory loss.  
 

Hearing Loss and Comorbidities in Aging: How Will Emerging Evidence Influence Future Best Practice in Audiology?

Saturday 05/11

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Terry-Lynn Young, PhD

Terry-Lynn Young is a professor and the Director of Genomics Research at Memorial University. She is also a recipient of the 2018 Governor Generals Award for Innovation. Trained as a molecular geneticist, Dr. Young’s lab has identified the genetic cause of several medically important conditions — including sudden cardiac death and hearing loss — by using special so-called “founder” populations. Dr. Young also leads a Canadian team that is currently exploring how to apply genomics information for better hearing outcomes.

Audiology in the 21st century: How Will Genomics Impact the Future of Hearing Healthcare?

Saturday 05/11

9:00 am - 10:00 am

Dr. Tara Zaugg, AuD, CCC-A

Dr. Tara Zaugg is a co-developer of Progressive Tinnitus Management (PTM), which is endorsed as the standard method of tinnitus management for United States Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals. She strives to understand the perspective of clinicians and patients using PTM, and to incorporate their needs and insights into PTM.

How Can You Apply the Latest Tinnitus Research and Best Practices to Support Your Patients?

Friday 05/10

1:30 pm - 4:30 pm