Poster Presentations

The language used in the descriptions below indicates which language the presentations will be presented in.


A Systematic Review of Mental Health Screening Tools for Use With Parents of Children With Disabilities

Authors: Michelle Phoenix, PhD, Reg. CASLPO, McMaster University and CanChild, Hamilton, ON; Daniella Manna, McMaster University, Speech-Language Pathology Program, Hamilton, ON;Miranda Wayland, McMaster University, Speech-Language Pathology Program, Hamilton, ON;Madeeha Wyne, McMaster University, Speech-Language Pathology Program, Hamilton, ON;Shauna Kingsnorth, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital; Shannon Scratch, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital; Marilyn Ballantyne, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital; Yani Hamdani, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital; Sam Pezzullo, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital; Shana Train.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Introductory

Age Group: Preschool (0-4)

Presented by: Michelle Phoenix, PhD, Reg. CASLPOMiranda Wayland, M.Sc.; and Shana Train, M.Sc., Reg. CASLPO

Parents of children with disabilities face increased risk for mental health challenges such as stress, depression and anxiety. In family-centred services, children’s rehabilitation providers may ask about these challenges in holistic family care. S-LPs and other service providers may feel ill-equipped to open these conversations with families. Therefore, researchers conducted this systematic review to identify mental health screening tools that are psychometrically sound and can be used by children’s rehabilitation service providers to identify parent mental health challenges and recommend further assessment or supports. This may promote timely referrals, family well-being and child development.


An Interdisciplinary Approach to Managing Cognitive Communication in Parkinson's Disease

Authors: W.Y. Stephanie Wong, M.H.Sc., S-LP(C) Reg. CASLPO, Assistive Technology Clinic, Toronto, ON;Karen Frydrych, MScOT, OT Reg. (Ont.), Assistive Technology Clinic, Toronto, ON;Mayzelle Parawan, M.H.Sc., S-LP(C) Reg. CASLPO, Assistive Technology Clinic, Toronto, ON;Pearl Gryfe, M.Sc., B.Sc.OT Reg.(ON), Assistive Technology Clinic, Toronto, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Adult (18-64), Seniors (65+)

Presented by: Stephanie Wong, M.H.Sc., Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C)

Cognitive-linguistic changes have been linked to frontal-subcortical changes in Parkinson’s disease (PD) (Aarsland et al., 2003), which negatively impact vocational abilities, social involvement and quality of life (Lawson et al., 2014). Though medical and rehabilitative interventions in PD have traditionally focused on motor deterioration, there is a growing body of evidence illustrating the importance of managing the non-motor symptomatology associated with PD (Chaudhuri et al., 2006). As research on the methods of addressing mild cognitive and language impairments in PD remains limited (Hindle et al., 2013), we developed and reviewed an interdisciplinary treatment protocol targeting cognitive communication within the context of PD.


Comparaison du rendement en orthographe syntaxique des élèves en milieux minoritaires.

Authors: Emilie Filion, étudiante MScS orthophonie, Université Laurentienne, Sudbury, ON; Michele Minor-Corriveau, Orthophoniste, MScS. PhD, Université Laurentienne, Sudbury, ON.

Sujet(s): Orthophonie, Aides en santé de la communication

Niveau: Intermédiaire

Groupe d’âge: Enfant d’âge scolaire (5-17)

Présenté par: Emilie Filion, étudiante MScS orthophonie and Michele Minor-Corriveau, MScS. PhD

La maîtrise de l’orthographe grammaticale nécessite un enseignement explicite. L'approfondissement de cette compétence prend au-delà de 14 ans (Pothier et Pothier, 2008), et plus encore en milieu minoritaire. Cette étude a comparé le rendement en orthographe syntaxique d’élèves de la 2e, 5e et 7e année aux Territoires du Nord-Ouest à celui des groupes d'âge semblables en Ontario. Les résultats indiquent que les filles réussissent mieux que les garçons, et ceux qui utilisent le français à la maison réussissent mieux que ceux utilisant l'anglais.


Comprehensive Assessment of Preschoolers’ Communicative Participation Using the Profile of Preschool Communication

Authors: Barbara Jane Cunningham, PhD, Western University, London, ON; Janis Oram Cardy, PhD, Western University, London, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Preschool (0-4)

Presented by: BJ Cunningham, PhD, Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C)

Through practice-based research we developed the profile of preschool communication (PPC), a data collection tool to support the holistic assessment of preschoolers’ communicative participation in the context of their communication difficulties and disorders. One part was developed through a Delphi consensus study, with 38 clinicians to ensure the content reflected both clinical and research expertise and with reliability testing. Other parts were developed through a review of the literature and clinical data. This presentation will describe the PPC and its clinical and research applications, and will be of interest to those engaged in practice-based research, assessment and evaluation.


Consonant Cluster Acquisition in Manitoba French Preschool Children Within a Nonlinear Phonology Framework

Authors: Daniel Bérubé, SAC member, Registered SLP, University professor, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON; Vanessa Hébert, Master’s student in SLP program, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON; Justin Frenette, Master’s student in SLP program, Ottawa, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Preschool (0-4)

Presented by: Daniel Bérubé, PhD, Reg. CASLPOVanessa Hébert, M.Sc. Candidate; and Justin Frenette, M.Sc. Candidate

We investigated cluster productions of French-speaking preschoolers from Manitoba with typical (TD) and protracted phonological development (PPD). Prior studies completed in Québec demonstrated higher cluster mismatches in longer words compared to shorter words and that children with TD had more substitutions compared to children with PPD, who had more deletions. The current findings set within nonlinear phonological analysis further revealed that children with PPD had lower PCC in clusters in unstressed syllables and in multisyllabic words. The additional information from nonlinear phonology will help interventionists better understand the complexities of cluster acquisition, and inform assessment and intervention practices with children.


Développement et validation du Voice Handicap Index en français québécois.

Authors: Lyne Defoy, orthophoniste, CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Québec, QC; Jean-Michel Bourque, MD, Université Laval, Québec, QC; Charles S. Batcho, physiothérapeute, PhD, Université Laval, Québec, QC; Pascale Tremblay, PhD, Université Laval, Québec, QC; Simon Gagnon, MD. FRCSC, CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Québec, QC; Vincent Martel-Sauvageau, orthophoniste, PhD, Université Laval, Québec, QC.

Sujet(s): Orthophonie

Niveau: Préliminaire

Groupe d’âge: Adulte (18-64), Aîné (65+)

Présenté par: Lyne Defoy, M.O.A.

Le Voice Handicap Index est un questionnaire appuyé par la recherche et fréquemment utilisé en pratique clinique afin d’évaluer l’impact de la dysphonie. Le but de cette étude était de développer, puis de valider, une nouvelle version du VHI en français québécois. Nous avons initialement élaboré l’adaptation franco-québécoise du questionnaire en respectant une procédure standardisée reconnue. Nous avons ensuite réalisé une analyse des propriétés psychométriques de l’instrument adapté auprès d’une cohorte de 150 personnes présentant une dysphonie et de 150 personnes sans trouble de la voix. L’outil développé présente des propriétés psychométriques suffisamment robustes pour en justifier l’utilisation clinique en contexte franco-québécois.


Divergences Between Complexity and Performance in Language Sample Analysis

Authors: Peter Cahill, S-LP(C), Reg. CASLPO, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON; Patricia Cleave, S-LP(C), Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS; Elissa Asp, Professor of Linguistics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS; Bonita Squires, S-LP(C), Doctoral candidate, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS; Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird, S-LP(C), Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: School Aged (5-17)

Presented by: Peter Cahill, Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C)

Language sample analysis (LSA) is a flexible assessment technique that provides rich data which can be examined in many ways. Some analysis techniques for LSA are thought to better represent the communication abilities of children from diverse backgrounds, including children acquiring more than one language. This study of language samples from 48 English monolingual and English-French bilingual children in two age groups (7 to 8 and 11 to 12) found divergences between mazing, errors and measures of syntactic complexity. These findings suggest the need for further research and cautious interpretation of individual measures, especially when assessing the communication of bilingual children.

 


Effects of Iconic Gestures on Children With Development Language Disorder

Authors: Keara Boyce, SLP Student, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: School Aged (5-17)

Presented by: Keara Boyce, M.Sc. Candidate

Gestures and speech go hand-in-hand and there is a strong link between gestures and language development, including facilitating word learning and recall. However, children with developmental language disorder (DLD) often struggle with word learning due to the difficulty of forming lexical representations. Gestures may facilitate word learning by supporting the formation of lexical representations and providing multiple pathways to the word for recall. Through a fast-mapping task, this study aims to explore whether gestures can facilitate stronger word learning among children with DLD, providing insights into word learning mechanisms and influencing methods for speech therapy.


Élaboration, validation et normalisation d’une tâche d’évaluation du discours narratif.

Authors: Anaïs Deleuze, Orthophoniste, professionnelle de recherche, CRIUGM, Montréal, QC; Laurence Charest, Orthophoniste, professionnelle de recherche, CRIUGM, Montréal, QC; Catherine Rochon, Étudiante, assistante de recherche, CRIUGM, Montréal, QC; Perrine Ferré, Orthophoniste, étudiante au doctorat, CRIUGM, Montréal, QC; Ana Inés Ansaldo, Chercheur, CRIUGM, Montréal, QC; Yves Joanette, Chercheur, CRIUGM, Montréal, QC.

Sujet(s): Orthophonie, Aides en santé de la communication

Niveau: Préliminaire

Groupe d’âge: Adulte (18-64), Aîné (65+)

Présenté par: Anaïs Deleuze, MPO, O(C)Laurence Charest, M.Sc.S; et Catherine Rochon, étudiante, assistante de recherche

Le i-MEL fr est une nouvelle batterie d’évaluation francophone informatisée des troubles acquis de la communication chez l’adulte. Constituée de 51 tâches réparties en 8 modules, elle cible notamment l’évaluation du discours narratif au moyen de rappels de récits présentés sous format vidéo.

Nous examinerons les avantages du format informatisé de cette tâche, son construit, ainsi que les données de fidélité inter- et intra-juges. Nous présenterons ensuite les résultats de la normalisation, et les dernières étapes de validation.


Engaging Stakeholders to Improve Outcome Measurement in Preschool Speech-Language Services

Authors: Barbara Jane Cunningham, PhD, Western University, London, ON; Janis Oram Cardy, PhD, Western University, London, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Preschool (0-4)

Presented by: BJ Cunningham, PhD, Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C)

Through stakeholder engagement and implementation science, we developed and piloted four webinar modules to support use of the Focus on the Outcomes of Communication Under Six (FOCUS). Forty-six speech-language pathologists completed an initial online survey, consecutively viewed four webinar modules and then completed a post survey. After viewing the modules, S-LPs reported significantly higher perceptions about the value of outcome monitoring and the validity and clinical utility of the FOCUS, along with intentions to use FOCUS data to support clinical decisions provincial outcome monitoring. We will present barriers and facilitators to this type of applied research.


Identification of Communicative Needs of People Living With Parkinson's Disease

Authors: Valérie Giguère, M.P.O., S-LP(C), Université de Montréal, CRIR, Regroupement INTER, Hampstead, QC; Claire Croteau, PhD, Université de Montréal, CRIR, Regroupement INTER; Maïlie Fortin, Université de Montréal, CRIR; Stefana Botez, Université de Montréal, CRIR; Ingrid Verduyckt, PhD, Université de Montréal, CRIR, Regroupement INTER.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Adult (18-64), Seniors (65+)

Presented by: Valérie Giguère, MPO, S-LP(C)

People living with Parkinson’s disease (PPD) present with speech and swallowing difficulties. Although speech therapy is a known, effective means to maintain functions or slow the progression of symptoms, access to therapy is limited. Technologies that offer support for voice therapy have recently been suggested as an interesting avenue for PPD, but there is little data available on the expectations and needs concerning speech-language pathology-related symptoms of this population. Our goal is to identify these expectations and needs by interviewing 10 PPD and performing a qualitative content analysis of the interviews. In this session, we will present the results of five interviews.


Implementation of Deva World for Persons With Dementia in Nursing Homes

Author: Ellen Hickey, Ph.D., S-LP(C), CCC-SLP, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Seniors (65+)

Presented by: Ellen Hickey, PhD, S-LP(C)

Provision of person-directed care with persons living with dementia (PLWD) can be difficult to achieve. Deva World (DW) by Mentia, an innovative simulated virtual world, is designed to support communication, creative expression of self and meaningful engagement to amplify personhood and dignity of PLWD. This mixed-methods study uses rating scales, interviews and focus groups to examine facilitators/barriers of implementation of DW in a nursing home. The results are useful for developing training manuals and organizational supports for implementation of DW, examining the impact of DW on person-directed care and personhood and determining how DW can transform person-centered clinical education.


Integrating Telepractice Into Post-Stroke Hospital-Based Outpatient Rehabilitation: A Pilot Study

Authors: Tina Vallentin, MSc(A), Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, ON; Lyn Turkstra, PhD, McMaster University, School of Rehabilitation Science, Hamilton, ON; Tara Packham, PhD, McMaster University, School of Rehabilitation Science, Hamilton, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: Adult (18-64), Seniors (65+)

Presented by: Tina Vallentin, M.Sc.(A.) and Yvette Hou, H.B.Sc.

Canadian stroke best practice guidelines now include telepractice. This study investigated the feasibility and satisfaction associated with implementing telepractice for speech-language pathology services. We recruited and randomized 20 participants into either telepractice or in-person speech-language pathology services. Satisfaction of services and goal attainment were not significantly different between treatment groups. The introduction of telepractice did not incur substantial costs to the clinic. Participant retention was 85% and those who withdrew from the study were in the telepractice group. Telepractice can be implemented feasibly post-stroke for individuals who have adequate access to technology.


Language and Communication Gains Following Intensive Treatment of Chronic Aphasia

Authors: Lauren Tittley, M.HSc., S-LP(C), McGill University School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Montreal, QC; Kelly Root, M.Sc., S-LP(C), McGill University School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Montreal, QC; Noémie Auclair-Ouellet, Ph.D., McGill University School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Montreal, QC.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Seniors (65+)

Presented by: Lauren Tittley, M.H.Sc., S-LP(C) and Kelly Root, M.Sc., S-LP(C)

Intensive comprehensive aphasia programs (ICAPs), which deliver on average 100 hours of treatment over four weeks, are becoming increasingly common. However, the research evidence for this level of intensity is incomplete. This study seeks to determine if a program that delivers a more moderate level of intensity (48 hours over 4 weeks) could result in communication and language gains in people with chronic aphasia. Seven participants with chronic aphasia participated. This level of treatment intensity was associated with gains in all participants.


Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Children and Adolescents: A Scoping Review Protocol

Authors: Marie-France Perrier, M.H.Sc., S-LP(C), reg. CASLPO, University of Ottawa; Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON; Heather Flowers, MEd, MHSc, PhD, CCC-SLP, S-LP(C), Reg CASLPO, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON; Nalia Gurgel-Juarez, DDS, M.Sc., University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON; Anna McCormick, M.D., FRCP(C), Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario; University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON; Sarah Short, PhD, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: Preschool (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

Presented by: Marie-France Perrier, MHSc, S-LP(C), Reg. CASLPO

Although mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) are becoming increasingly popular, the application of MBIs in children and adolescents is still in its infancy. Mapping the existing literature relating to pediatric MBIs could help guide cognitive-communication interventions in children and adolescents with acquired brain injury. Our scoping review will synthesize evidence of reported MBIs for children and adolescents with and without physical, mental and cognitive disorders. Based on our synthesis and identified gaps in the literature, we will provide direction to researchers so that they may advance the evidence base for using MBIs in pediatric populations.


MIS Stats Expedition to Excellence

Authors: Jane Loncke, M.Sc. (Communication Sciences & Disorders), St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, ON; Ravi Sivakumaran, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, ON; Emanuel Baltaga, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, ON; Demetree Kallergis, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, ON; Maragaret Maclennan, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamiton, Hamilton, ON; Andriana Lukich, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists 

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Preschool (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Seniors (65+)

Presented by: Jane Loncke, MSc

In 2017, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton (SJHH) implemented a new electronic health information system. Consequently, SJHH required an alternative data capture, reporting and auditing system to ensure statistics (patient activity, workload and caseload) were captured and available for the therapeutics department (inclusive of speech-language pathology and audiology). Under the collective leadership of Professional Practice, Finance and Digital Solutions, SJHH successfully completed the development, implementation and evaluation journey, “MIS Stats Expedition to Excellence”, in only 5 months.


Narrative Language Assessment: Measuring Pre-readers’ Event Knowledge

Authors: Lynn Dempsey, PhD, Reg. CASLPO, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Preschool (0-4)

Presented by: Lynn Dempsey, PhD, Reg. CASLPO

The purpose of this study was to examine the validity of three methods of pre-measuring children’s event knowledge as part of the narrative language assessment. Thirty-eight typically developing pre-readers completed measures (verbal account, enactment, picture-sequencing) that tapped their knowledge of two different events, listened to stories based on each event and then completed a comprehension task. Results suggested that both verbal accounts and enactment are potentially useful tools for determining the extent to which a child has requisite event knowledge for story comprehension.


Parent Involvement in Speech-Language Pathology Intervention Workshop

Authors: Lisa Schumacher, S-LP(C), OOAQ, CIUSSS Centre-Ouest-de-l'île-de-Montréal Centre de Réadaptation Lethbridge Layton Mackay, Montreal, QC.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Preschool (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

Presented by: Lisa Schumacher, MSc(A), S-LP(C)

Evidence shows that parents and caregivers can effectively implement speech-language pathology interventions, leading to greater progress towards speech and language goals over time. We will review definitions and research evidence and then focus on strategies to better integrate parents and increase their participation in interventions, building in success for the parent and child and adapting to different parents’ needs.
 
Participants will rate current parent involvement in their sessions using a continuum tool and then complete a specific plan regarding how they will implement one of the workshop strategies with a specific client. Time permitting, participants will share and discuss their plans.


Parent-Report and Vocabulary Assessment of Preschool Children

Authors: Katie Gervais, BScS, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Chantal Mayer-Crittenden, PhD, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Roxanne Bélanger, PhD, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: reschool (0-4)

Presented by: Katie Gervais, BScS

Vocabulary is influenced by language exposure, especially if the language in question is a minority. Previous research has documented the validity of parental report as an overall assessment of child language and as a measure of expressive vocabulary. This study investigated the validity of a parent-reported measure of vocabulary and determined the correlation between language exposure and the child’s performance on a formal vocabulary assessment. This presentation will share data for typically developing monolingual and bilingual children aged 36 months and living in Northeastern Ontario. Preliminary results show positive correlations between parental report and standardized test scores.


Post-Stroke Narrative Discourse Recovery: A Longitudinal Study

Authors: Amelie Brisebois, MHSc. S-LP(C), Ph.D. candidate, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC; Simona Maria Brambati, PhD, CRIUGM;  Marianne Désilets-Barnabé, BHSc; Johémie Boucher, BSc, PhD candidate; Alberto Osa Garcia, MSc, PhD candidate; Elizabeth Rochon, PhD; Carol Leonard, PhD; Alex Desautels, MD, PhD; Karine Marcotte, PhD.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists 

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Adult (18-64), Seniors (65+)

Presented by: Amelie Brisebois, MHSc, S-LP(C)

Discourse is amongst the most complex language task and its impairment is frequent in people with aphasia (PWA) following a stroke. The latest findings confirm the need to investigate discourse production from the acute to the chronic stage, and the aim of this study is to document discourse recovery over that period. Sixteen PWA completed a language assessment including a descriptive discourse task at three time points: 0 to 48 hours, 7 to 10 days and 6 months post-stroke. The study also recruited 16 healthy participants. This study discusses the implication of discourse assessment and recovery in PWA.


Problem-Based Learning in a Speech-Language Pathology Program: Curriculum, Tutorials and Evidence-Based Practice

Authors: Michelle Phoenix, PhD, Reg. CASLPO, McMaster University and CanChild, Hamilton, ON; Wenonah Campbell, PhD, McMaster University and CanChild, Hamilton, ON; Justine Hamilton, MClSc MBA, Director of Clinical Education and an Assistant Professor in the School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON; Lyn Turkstra, Assistant Dean, Speech-Language Pathology Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Introductory

Age Group: Preschool (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Seniors (65+)

Presented by: Michelle Phoenix, PhD, Reg. CASLPOWenonah Campbell, PhDJustine Hamilton, MClSc, MBA, Reg. CASLPO; and Lyn Turkstra, PhD

Problem-based learning is an approach to learning that fosters students’ self-directedness in focusing on a particular client situation to promote applied learning, evidence-based practice, critical thinking and clinical reasoning. The McMaster speech-language pathology program is one of few problem-based speech-language pathology programs in the world. We will illustrate how the program applied a problem-based approach to develop a curriculum that integrates content across courses, inform problem-based tutorials and teach evidence-based practice. Clinicians, educators, students and researchers can inform their work by learning what problem-based learning is and how it has been applied.


Promoting Communication With Persons With Dementia: An Appreciative Inquiry

Authors: Ellen Hickey, PhD, S-LP(C), CCC-SLP, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Seniors (65+)

Presented by: Ellen Hickey, PhD, S-LP(C)

This study used appreciative inquiry in two phases to promote caregiver-informed and evidence-based communication/memory strategy use in long-term care settings with people with dementia (PWD). It also used focus groups to understand caregivers’ attitudes and experiences, and to collaboratively develop action plans to empower best practice implementation of communication and memory aids with PWD. Caregivers described useful nonverbal communication strategies, but were not familiar with using external aids. S-LPs can use participatory approaches to accelerate the research to practice pipeline in order to promote safe, equitable and engaging environments for persons with communication disorders. 


Répertoire phonologique d’enfants bilingues arabe algérien- français québécois âgés de 3 ans

Authors: Rabia Sabah Meziane, Étudiante au doctorat, Université de Montréal, Saint-Laurent, Montréal, QC; Andrea A.N. MacLeod, Professeure, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.

Sujet(s): Orthophonie, Aides en santé de la communication

Niveau: Préliminaire

Groupe d’âge: Enfant d’âge préscolaire (0-4)

Présenté par: Rabia Sabah Meziane, Étudiante au doctorat

Cette étude décrit les habiletés phonologiques de 9 enfants québécois d’origine algérienne âgés de 3 ans. Grâce à l’analyse de la performance de ces enfants lors d’une tâche de dénomination d’images dans chacune des langues ciblées, nous avons démontré qu’il existe une interaction entre leurs deux systèmes phonologiques. En effet, une analyse préliminaire par Test T Student démontre une différence significative en ce qui a trait au pourcentage de consonnes correctes entre les consonnes partagées par les deux langues et les consonnes spécifiques au français ou à l’arabe. Cette interaction se traduit par un transfert positif en faveur des consonnes partagées par les deux langues.


S-LP Work Setting Perspectives on Arranging Successful Clinical Placements: Applying Key Success Factors

Authors: Lynn Ellwood, BSc(CD), MHSc, MBA, S-LP(C) Reg. CASLPO, University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Toronto, ON; Jennifer Wadds, MHSc., Reg. CASLPO, University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Toronto, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Preschool (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Seniors (65+)

Presented by: Lynn Ellwood, BSc (CD), MHSc, MBA, Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C) and Jennifer Wadds, MHSc, Reg. CASLPO

This poster presentation will illustrate practical application of new knowledge developed in a research study addressing key success factors (KSFs) for clinical placement planning. The study used a mixed methods primarily qualitative applied research design featuring a semi-structured interview format and inductive qualitative content data analysis. We identified eight KSFs, which were consistent with models of service supply chain management (SSCM) and strategic supplier alliance formation. The presenters, both university-based coordinators of clinical education, will illustrate and discuss examples of how knowledge of KSFs have influenced day-to-day placement planning work.


Sound Amplification Systems in Classrooms: Benefits for Pupils and Teachers

Authors: Baiba Trinite, PhD, Associate Professor, Liepaja University, Liepaja, Latvia.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64)

Presented by: Baiba Trinite, PhD

Voice ergonomics is a part of the broad ergonomic field. It includes providing comfortable speaking and hearing environments. This study investigated the impact of sound field amplification systems (SFAS) on the improvement of monosyllabic non-word perception in grade 1 to 4 pupils, and on voice parameters in elementary school teachers with and without voice disorders. The results showed that SFAS benefits perception of monosyllabic non-words in monolingual grade 1 pupils both in bad and good acoustic conditions. SFAS also decrease voice intensity and fundamental frequency in elementary school female teachers without voice disorders and laryngeal pathology.


Speech Movement Control in Stuttering: Intensive Treatment Reduces Variability

Authors: Torrey Loucks, PhD, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB; Kristin Pelcarski, PhD, CCC-SLP, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS; Holly Lomheim, MSLP, R.SLP, S-LP (C), Institute for Stuttering Treatment and Research - Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB; Brynn Davies, MSc SLP, R.SLP, Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB; Stephanie Thomlinson, MSc SLP, R.SLP, Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Alberta, St. Albert, AB; Sarena Poets, MSc SLP, R.SLP, Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Adult (18-64)

Presented by: Holly Lomheim, MSLP, R.SLP, S-LP(C)

Stuttering disfluencies are noisy and unpredictable, but studying the fluent speech of adults who stutter (AWS) may provide insight into the nature of stuttering. We monitored the variability of fluent speech movements in eight AWS before and after completing the comprehensive stuttering program. The movement variability of real word utterances decreased significantly in all participants after the intervention, but only for preferred speech styles. Movement variability did not decrease for all participants when using fluency skills despite being fluent in each condition. Intensive stuttering therapy reduces the variability of fluent speech, but is most apparent for preferred speaking styles.


Speech-Language Service Delivery for Linguistically Diverse Adults with Aphasia: A Canadian Survey

Authors: Jennika Soles, MSc, S-LP(C), Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS; Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird, PhD, S-LP(C), Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS; Janet Ingles, PhD, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: Adult (18-64)

Presented by: Jennika Soles, MSc, S-LP(C)

Canadian S-LPs regularly work with linguistically diverse clients (LDCs), and S-LPs report aphasia as the most difficult disorder to assess and treat in this population. While SAC guidelines recommend providing services in the native language of the LDC, many S-LPs can only offer services in the languages they speak. This nationwide survey of S-LPs working with LDCs with aphasia investigates which languages are underserved, what particular training S-LPs have received, what assessment and intervention strategies they employ and what barriers they face. This presentation will discuss results on the accessibility of linguistically diverse services nationwide.


Studies Involving Young AAC Users Are Not Targeting Their Needs

Authors: Tithi Paul, Master's candidate, McMaster University, Hamilton, AB; Patrick McPhee, Post Doctoral Fellow, McMaster University.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64)

Presented by: Tithi Paul, MSc Candidate

Young people with speech and language impairments who use AAC devices often abandon these devices, despite their benefits. Through a rapid review, we assessed studies involving young AAC users for whether they were targeting the users’ needs. We extracted the purposes of the eligible studies and linked them to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). The study purposes often targeted verbal, nonverbal and/or communication through a device, as well as the use and operation of AAC devices. Studies rarely targeted the involvement of the users’ natural communication partners, yet this remains one of the biggest needs for young AAC users.


The Role of Artificial Intelligence in the Treatment and Diagnosis of Post-Stroke Aphasia: A Scoping Review

Authors: Sofia Afanasieva, MSc candidate Speech-Language Pathology, BSc Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON; Aïda Cherid, MSc candidate Speech-Language Pathology, Bsc Linguistics and Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON; Luana Farias Tadros, MSc Candidate Speech-Language Pathology, Post graduate degree in ABA intervention, BA Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON; Carol Leonard, Ph.D. Communication Sciences and Disorders with specialization in Speech-Language Pathology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Adult (18-64), Seniors (65+)

Presented by: Sofia Afanasieva, BSc, MSc CandidateAïda Cherid, BSc, MSc Candidate; and Luana Farias Tadros, BA, post graduate degree in ABA intervention, MSc Candidate

This scoping review investigates the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in the field of speech-language pathology, specifically in the treatment and diagnosis of post-stroke aphasia. We believe that major advancements in the field of computational linguistics may improve the treatment and/or diagnosis of aphasia, potentially leading to a better life for many stroke survivors. The purpose of this review is to methodically identify research addressing this issue. A search of six databases identified 64 articles. Preliminary evidence suggests a potential positive clinical use of AI in the field of automatic speech recognition. Extraction and analysis of the data is ongoing.


Universal Design for Learning in Early Childhood Education: A Rapid Scoping Review

Authors: Wenonah Campbell, PhD, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON; Keerththana Kumaravel, M.Sc., Reg. CASLPO, CBI Home Health, Pickering, ON; M.Sc., Reg. CASLPO, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton General Hospital, Kitchener, ON; Rachel Pond, M.Sc., Reg. CASLPO, McMaster University, Brampton, ON; Raman Sandhu, M.Sc., Reg. CASLPO, McMaster University, Kitchener, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: Preschool (0-4)

Presented by: Wenonah Campbell, PhDKeerththana Kumaravel, M.Sc., Reg. CASLPONadine Kuntze, M.Sc., Reg. CASLPO; and Rachel Pond, M.Sc., Reg. CASLPO

Universal design for learning (UDL) is a framework for supporting inclusive education. We performed a rapid scoping review to determine how UDL is described and implemented by S-LPs working in early childhood education (ECE) settings. Findings show that S-LPs are collaboratively implementing UDL in a variety of ways; however, they are not explicitly connecting what they do to the UDL framework. This study provides a broad understanding of how S-LPs describe and implement UDL-aligned services in preschool settings. Overall, UDL is a framework with promise for guiding S-LP-ECE collaboration but more empirical research is needed.


Universal Design for Learning: Collaborating to Support Preschool Language Development

Authors: Nicole Moore, MClSc, Registered CASLPO,  S-LP(C), CHEO, Ottawa, ON; Deirdre Mander, M.Sc., Registered CASLPO, S-LP(C), CHEO, Ottawa, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: Preschool (0-4)

Presented by: Nicole Moore, MClSc, Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C) and Deirdre Mander, MSc, Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C)

Universal design for learning (UDL) is an evidence-based program focusing on proactively designing inclusive learning environments (CAST, 2016). This study explored how UDL can facilitate collaboration between S-LPs and early childhood educators (ECEs). Eight ECEs worked with two S-LPs in four preschools, and S-LPs completed logs for each visit. Individual semi-structured interviews probed ECEs’ perceptions about UDL. Qualitative content analysis revealed ECEs felt they already had good rapport with the S-LP, but implementing UDL principles allowed more opportunities to work together. ECEs identified UDL as helpful to all children, thereby better addressing children’s language needs.


Use of Lean Six Sigma to Reduce Assessment Wait Times

Authors: Laurie-Ann Staniforth, M.P.O, Reg. CASLPO, First Words, Orleans, ON; Marika Holmes, M.Sc., S-LP(C), Reg. CASLPO; Jennifer Kiesewalter, M.Sc., S-LP(C) Reg. CASLPO.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: Preschool (0-4)

Presented by: Laurie-Ann Staniforth, MPO, Reg. CASLPO; Marika Holmes, MSc, Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C); and Jennifer Kiesewalter, MSc, Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C)

In January 2008, First Words, the Preschool Speech and Language Program of Ottawa, embarked on a quality improvement initiative to reduce assessment wait times. The goal was to reduce the average assessment wait time to 90 days without adding staff or reducing treatment services. The program used the methodologies and tools of Lean Six Sigma to guide service delivery changes. In the 12 months since implementation, the number of assessment completed increased by 34% and the average assessment wait time decreased by 51 days.


WAB-R adaptation to Franco-Ontarians

Authors: Barbara Coelho, BA, Masters student, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Sophie Laurence, PhD, SLP reg CASLPO, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON.

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: Adult (18-64), Seniors (65+)

Presented by: Barbara Coelho, BA, MScS Candidate

Assessment of language abilities requires that speech-language pathologists administer standardized tests. This is a challenge when assessing language skills in bilingual populations, due to the lack of standardized tools and normalized data for these populations. The main objective of this research is to adapt the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised (WAB–R) to the Franco-Ontarian language using Vallerand’s methodology of cross-cultural back-translations. The adaptation of the WAB-R will provide S-LPs with a culturally-appropriate assessment tool for improved accuracy in determining the presence of acquired language disorders in Franco-Ontarians with neurological disorders.