Poster Presentations

The language used in the descriptions below indicates which language the presentations will be presented in.


Assessing Preschoolers’ Speech-Language Pathology Services Effectiveness: What Data to Collect?

Authors: Marianne Paul, Ph. D., Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, QC; Marie-Ève Caty, Ph. D., Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, QC; Dima Safi, Ph. D., Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, QC; Jessica Lesage, B. A., B. Sc. (orthophonie), M. P. O., Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, QC; Julie Tardif, orthophoniste, CIUSSS Estrie -CHUS-CRE, Sherbrooke, QC; Julie Duguay, CIUSSS Estrie -CHUS-CRE, Sherbrooke, QC

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Pre-School

Presented by: Marianne Paul, PhD

Public health decision makers, practitioners and the public are increasingly interested in evidence of intervention effectiveness. Committed to the ongoing quality improvement of their services, the speech-language pathologists working in the Programme Langage-Parole of the CIUSSS de l’Estrie – Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke (from the installation Centre de réadaptation Estrie) teamed-up with researchers from the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières. Following a collaborative evaluation process involving the evaluators, stakeholders and partners, an optimized language skills assessment for preschoolers was designed, which is both evidence- and practice-based.


Bilingual Core Vocabulary List for Children Who Use AAC

Authors: Manon Robillard, M.Sc.S., PhD, Reg. CASLPO, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Kelsey Lapointe, B.Sc.S Candidate, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Catherine Contant, B.Sc.S Candidate, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Alyshia Kiernan, M.Sc.S. Candidate, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Joannie Morris, M.Sc.S. Candidate, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: School Aged

Presented by: Manon Robillard, M.Sc.S., PhD, Kelsey Lapointe, B.Sc.S Candidate, Catherine Contant, B.Sc.S Candidate, Alyshia Kiernan, M.Sc.S. Candidate and Joannie Morris, M.Sc.S. Candidate

Various studies have created core vocabulary lists for monolingual children (i.e. English or French only). However, according to Statistics Canada (2013), 91% of francophone youth (excluding Quebec) converse in both French and English by the time they finish school. The goal of this new study is to create a bilingual core vocabulary list in order to facilitate the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems for bilingual children who have complex communication needs. The results of this study will not only benefit these children but will also facilitate the work of speech-language pathologists who program AAC devices.


Comparison of Speech Amplification Devices in Individuals with Parkinsons Disease

Authors: Thea Knowles, B.A. (Hon), Western University, London, ON; Scott Adams, PhD, ,Western University, London, ON; Allyson Page, PhD, S-LP(C), Western University, London, ON; Daryn Cushnie-Sparrow, B.A. (Hon), Western University, London, ON; Mandar Jod, MD, Movement Disorders Centre, London, ON

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Senior

Presented by: Thea Knowles, B.A. (Hon)

Hypophonia, a reduction in speech loudness, is one of the most prevalent speech impairments associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). The present study compared the performance of three devices hypothesized to lead to improvements in speech communication in individuals with PD and hypophonia. Individuals with PD and their caregivers participated in a crossover design study in which they tested the three devices in a laboratory environment as well as during one-week trial periods at home. Results are expected to better inform treatment options for individuals with PD and their caregivers regarding their communication.


Conversational Memory Notebooks and Person-Centred Communication in Dementia

Authors: Kelsey Dynes, M.Sc. Candidate, Western University, London, ON; Joseph B Orange, PhD, S-LP(C), Reg. CASLPO, Western University, London, ON; Marie Savundranayagam, PhD, Western University, London, ON; Marita Kloseck, PhD, Western University, London, ON

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Adult, Senior

Presented by: Kelsey Dynes, M.Sc. Candidate

Communication problems are recognized clinically in persons with dementia. The purpose of this study is to show whether electronic memory notebooks, combined with person-centred care, can improve conversations between a person with dementia and the family caregiver. Participants will use an electronic memory notebook in their conversations both pre- and post-intervention. Participants will also be educated and trained on using person-centred communication strategies. Audio recorded conversations will be analyzed for the proportions of person-centered utterances pre-and post-intervention. The clinical importance of person-centered communication enhancement education and training programs for persons with dementia and their family will be discussed.


Effectiveness of Target WordTM: A Language Intervention for Late Talkers

Authors: Elaine Kwok, MClSc, PhD Candidate, Western University, London, ON; Barbara Cunningham, PhD, S-LP(C) Reg. CASLPO, Western University, London, ON; Cindy Earle, M.A., SLP-CCC, Reg. CASLPO, The Hanen Centre, Toronto, ON; Janis Oram Cardy, PhD, S-LP(C), Western University, London, ON

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Pre-School

Presented by: Elaine Kwok, MClSc, PhD Candidate

Target WordTM – The Hanen Program® for Parents of Children Who Are Late Talkers is a parent-based language intervention program for children who are late to talk. The communicative participation outcomes of children who were a part of this program are rarely reported. We conducted a retrospective clinical chart review of children whose parents participated in the Target WordTM program and analyzed changes in scores on the FOCUS© assessment, a clinical tool that measures children’s communicative participation skills. Over 70% of children made clinically significant gains on the FOCUS© assessment after the intervention, demonstrating the effectiveness of the program for improving real world communication functions.


Effects of Social Skills Group Participation in Children with ASD

Authors: Judith Lam Tang, M.Sc, R.SLP, S-LP(C), Centre for Autism Services Alberta, Edmonton, AB; Joanne Fodchuk, MSLP, R.SLP, Centre for Autism Services Alberta, Edmonton, AB

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Pre-School, School Aged

Presented by: Judith Lam Tang, M.Sc, R.SLP, S-LP(C) and Joanne Fodchuk, MSLP, R.SLP

This study examines the effects of participation in a social skills group on the parents’ perception of social skills in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Data from the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS-2) pre- and post-treatment were analyzed for eight children. The social skills group consisted of eight weekly, 60-minute concurrent parent and child sessions. The SRS-2 identifies and quantifies the severity of social impairment associated with ASD. Review of SRS-2 T-scores indicated that at least one subscale and/or total score improved for seven out of the eight children. This indicates that group participation led to some reduction in social impairment according to the parents’ report.


Exploring Complex Syntax in School-Age Children

Authors: Peter Cahill, M.Sc. Candidate, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS; Patricia Cleave, PhD, S-LP(C), Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS; Bonita Squires, PhD Candidate, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS; Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird, PhD, S-LP(C), Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: School Aged

Presented by: Peter Cahill, M.Sc. Candidate

The aim of the study was to evaluate established and novel metrics of syntactic development in school-age children and to compare elicitation tasks. The participants were 24 children recruited from the province of Nova Scotia in four groups: monolingual and bilingual (French and English) children 7 and 12 years of age. The groups were compared using language sample measures. Important syntactic development continues during the early school-age years. Established and novel metrics generally showed sensitivity to age and discourse type, but not bilingualism. The measures validated interest in the application of theoretical syntax to language assessment.


Impact de l’exposition bilingue sur le vocabulaire dans un contexte minoritaire

Auteures : Katie Gervais, B. Sc. S. (candidate), Université Laurentienne, Sudbury, ON

Sujet(s) : Orthophonie, Aides en santé de la communication

Niveau: Intermédiaire

Groupe d’âge : Enfant d’âge préscolaire

Présenté par : Katie Gervais, B. Sc. S. (candidate)

Cette étude avait comme but d’étudier la relation entre l’exposition aux langues et le développement du vocabulaire dans un contexte minoritaire. Les résultats ont montré que les enfants bilingues franco-dominants réussissaient moins bien que les francophones monolingues, tandis que les bilingues anglo-dominants réussissaient semblablement aux anglophones monolingues.


Implementation of a Group Treatment Model to Reduce Wait Times

Authors: Taylor Broda, M.Sc., S-LP(C), Nova Scotia Hearing and Speech Centres, Halifax, NS; Emily Murray, B.A., CDA, Nova Scotia Hearing and Speech Centres, Halifax, NS; Jenny McDonald, M.Sc., S-LP(C), Nova Scotia Hearing and Speech Centres, Dartmouth, NS; Robyn MacDonald, M.Sc., S-LP(C), Nova Scotia Hearing and Speech Centres, Dartmouth, NS

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Pre-School

Presented by: Taylor Broda, M.Sc., S-LP(C), Emily Murray, B.A., CDA and Jenny McDonald, M.Sc., S-LP(C)

This poster describes the development and implementation of a group-based service delivery model to address long wait times for preschool speech and language services. Services were provided in an innovative way to align with client- and family-centred care principles. This model led to reduced wait times.


Improved Reading in Individuals with Alexia after Dual-Route Reading Treatment

Authors: Grace Lee, B.Sc., University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB; Shrida Sahadevan, M.Sc., University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB; Esther Kim, PhD, R.SLP, CCC-SLP, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Adult, Senior

Presented by: Grace Lee, B.Sc.

Alexia is an acquired reading impairment that often accompanies aphasia. Although both lexical-semantic (whole-word) and sub-lexical (sounding out) routes are engaged during reading, many reading treatments only focus on a single modality. Two individuals with chronic aphasia and alexia received intensive reading therapy (25-30 hours over 2 weeks) targeting the lexical-semantic route (using connected text) and the sub-lexical route (through phonological treatment). Gains in spelling, phonological awareness, reading comprehension and fluency were observed in both participants. Applying the dual-route reading model and engaging both pathways in treatment can contribute to efficacious reading rehabilitation.


Improving Communication to Parents of Children Born Prematurely Regarding the Development of Language, Feeding and Play Skills: A Systematic Review

Authors: Dominique Leroux, Master’s Candidate, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Roxanne Belanger, M.H.Sc., PhD, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: Pre-School

Presented by: Dominique Leroux, Master’s Candidate

Following the discharge of a preterm child, parents are supported through a neonatal follow-up program (NFUP). Through assessments and consultations, these programs foster parental resilience by teaching them about their child’s developmental pattern (Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health, 2015). As there are many professionals involved in NFUPs, parents often receive information from multiple developmental domains, which can be overwhelming. A systematic review was completed to determine the best practices for providing early intervention in the development of language, feeding and play skills in premature children 2-4 years of age. The conclusions drawn will allow speech-language pathologists to educate parents on the best-practices to prevent delays.


Intensive Group Therapy for Adults Who Stutter Integrating ACT

Authors: Marie-Ève Caty, Ph. D., Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, QC; Frederick Dionne, Ph. D., Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, QC; Nancy Blanchette, M.P.O., CIUSS de la Mauricie-et-du-Centre-du-Québec, Trois-Rivières, QC

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Adult

Presented by: Marie-Eve Caty, PhD

This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive group intervention integrating Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for adults who stutter (n=3). The program — held over the course of two three-day weekends — took place at a student university clinic. This is a one-group pretest-posttest design. The three participants completed self-reported questionnaires before and after the intensive therapy, as well as at one month, three months and six months post-therapy. The frequency of stuttered syllables were also assessed for each of the time points. The results show significant improvements in psychosocial functioning, mindfulness skills, psychological flexibility and overall speech fluency.


Is Play Just for Fun? Exploring Western Canadian Parents’ Perceptions

Authors: Laureen McIntyre, PhD, S-LP(C), CCC-SLP, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK; Laurie-ann Hellsten, PhD, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK; Yolanda Palmer-Clarke, PhD, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK; Kate Gibb, M.Ed. Candidate, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: Pre-School, School Aged

Presented by: Laureen McIntyre, PhD, S-LP(C), CCC-SLP

Parental beliefs about the role of play in learning and development vary widely. These beliefs are related to a parents’ cultural and socioeconomic background and have a reciprocal effect on children’s play behaviour in terms of frequency and choice of play forms and themes. However, little is known about Canadian parents’ beliefs of children’s play. This is of particular concern when play-based learning and interventions are recommended for use by parents, guardians, educators and professionals supporting children’s learning and development. The overall purpose of this study is to explore the Western Canadian parents' cultural perspectives and developmental assumptions of play.


Knowledge to Action Roadmap for Literacy Education of Children with SSPI Who Use AAC

Authors: Mélodie Serré, M.Sc.S. Candidate, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Pascal Lefebvre, PhD, Reg. CASLPO & OOAQ, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Jocelyn Barden-Underhill, M.Sc., CCC-SLP, Reg. CASLPO, Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre, Ottawa, ON; Amita Bhargava Furgoch, B.Sc., OT Reg. (ON), Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre, Ottawa, Ottawa, ON; Leslie Walker, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre School, Ottawa, ON; Jean Ju, PhD, C. Psych., Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre, Ottawa, ON; Tania Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Renfrew Country District School Board, Renfrew, ON

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Pre-School, School Aged

Presented by: Mélodie Serré, M.Sc.S. Candidate and Pascal Lefebvre, PhD, Reg. CASLPO & OOAQ

Studies have shown that children with severe speech and physical impairments (SSPI) who communicate with AAC have difficulties acquiring literacy skills (Larsson, Sandberg, & Smith, 2009). A gap between current and best practices in their literacy education has been identified as one of the main causes (Sturm et al, 2006). The Knowledge to Action (KTA) cycle offers a framework that can bridge this gap (Graham et al. 2006). This research project used the first five phases of the KTA cycle, along with qualitative methods from thematic analysis to understand the process behind using the best practices and created an operationalized roadmap for literacy education for these children.


La hiérarchisation des erreurs d\'orthographe lexicales des élèves franco-ontariens

Auteurs : Robin Clément, B. A. (Sp.Ps.), B. Sc. S. (orthophonie), Université Laurentienne, Sudbury, ON; Michèle Minor-Corriveau, M. Sc. S. (orthophonie), Ph. D., OAOO, Université Laurentienne, Sudbury, ON

Sujet(s) : Orthophonie, Aides en santé de la communication

Niveau: Intermédiaire

Groupe d’âge : Enfant d’âge scolaire

Présenté par : Robin Clément, B.A. (Sp. Ps.), B. Sc. S. (orthophonie)

L’apprentissage de l’écriture englobe plusieurs aspects, dont l’apprentissage de l’orthographe lexicale, soit la séquence de lettres attendue dans chaque mot selon les dictionnaires (Hawken, 2009). En raison de sa complexité, le système orthographique français devrait être enseigné de façon explicite (Chapleau, Laplante & Brodeur, 2014, Fayol, 2008). Cependant, depuis la dernière révision curriculaire, le ministère de l’Éducation de l’Ontario (2006) ne propose aucun encadrement pour enseigner explicitement l’orthographe lexicale. Aucune étude n’aborde la hiérarchisation des erreurs d’orthographe lexicales produites par des élèves franco-ontariens.


Online Refresher Modules for Incoming S-LP Students

Authors: Karen Pollock, PhD, R.SLP, CCC-SLP, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB; Salima Suleman, PhD, S-LP(C), University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB

Topic for: Students

Level: Introductory

Age Group: Adult

Presented by: Karen Pollock, PhD, R.SLP, CCC-SLP

Graduate students enter speech-language pathology (S-LP) programs with varying levels of knowledge and confidence in prerequisite content. Two online refresher modules (one in phonetics and one in neuroanatomy) designed to review key concepts and practice skills from undergraduate coursework were piloted with incoming S-LP students. Changes in knowledge and confidence were measured through pre- and post-unit quiz scores and pre- and post-module surveys. Results indicated that the modules were an effective means of refreshing basic concepts and skills and for priming students for the clinical application of material.


Pre-Readers' Comprehension of Narratives With Competing Character Goals

Authors: Lynn Dempsey, PhD, Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C), Brock University, St. Catharines, ON; Elizabeth Skarakis-Doyle, PhD, Western University, London, ON

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Pre-School

Presented by: Lynn Dempsey, PhD, Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C)

The ability of pre-readers to comprehend a narrative with competing character goals was examined. 58 typically developing children in three age groups— 2 ½-3, 3-4 and 4-5 years — were read a story where the goals of the protagonist and a secondary character conflicted. Inferencing and comprehension of explicit content were tested. Children in the oldest groups grasped more than 50% of the content elements. Children in the youngest group grasped only 20%. A majority in each age group inferred the goal. However, few children linked actions with goal, indicating difficulty grasping the goal structure of a story with competing goals.


Reading Comprehension Abilities in the Bilingual Aging Population

Authors: Sophie Laurence, M.Sc.S. Candidate, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Michèle Minor-Corriveau, PhD, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Adult, Senior

Presented by: Sophie Laurence, M.Sc.S. Candidate

A high proportion of the aging population presents low literacy skills. Very few studies have examined variability in levels of reading comprehension in the aging population and its relation to bilingualism. This study examines the relationship between reading comprehension abilities, age and bilingualism. Contrary to our hypotheses, preliminary results indicated no significant age-related decline in health literacy or reading comprehension. Our results also indicated that health literacy and reading comprehension abilities did not differ between anglophones and bilinguals. The interpretation of these results will be discussed in regards to age, language, cognitive functions and education.


Reliability of International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) Transcriptions Generated by Applications and Websites

Authors: Danica Berthiaume, B.H.Sc., Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Michèle Minor-Corriveau, PhD, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Carly Belanger, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Advanced

Age Group: Pre-School, School-Aged

Presented by: Danica Berthiaume, B.H.Sc.

Given the lack of recent studies on IPA transcription, and the availability of websites and applications who purport to reliably transcribe speech, it seems important to study the reliability of these computer-generated IPA transcriptions. This study seeks to establish the phonetic variations of English phonemes between applications or websites and to examine the differences in the phonetic transcription of phonemes of the same sample from these websites and applications. This presentation will explore methodology and results of this study.


Sensitivity of Sentence Imitation for Bilinguals with Developmental Language Disorders

Authors: Jenna Lachance, B.Sc.S, M.Sc.S Candidate, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Chantal Mayer-Crittenden, M.H.Sc., PhD, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: School Aged

Presented by: Jenna Lachance, B.Sc.S, M.Sc.S Candidate and Chantal Mayer-Crittenden, M.H.Sc., PhD

The assessment of bilingual children’s language abilities can be challenging for clinicians because bilingual children learning a second language present similar language characteristics to those with developmental language disorders (DLD). Sentence imitation (SI) tasks are useful tools to assess language abilities in bilingual children. Children with DLD typically score lower on these tasks. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of bilingual exposure on the performance of SI tasks and to determine the accuracy of the SI tasks in identifying DLD in bilingual children. The SI tasks can be used as diagnostic tools in identifying DLD.


Spontaneous Language Sample Analysis of School-Aged Children Born Prematurely

Authors: Valérie Caza, M.H.Sc. Candidate, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Roxanne Belanger, M.H.Sc., PhD, S-LP(C), Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: School Aged

Presented by: Valérie Caza, M.H.Sc. Candidate

Children born prematurely are more susceptible to language delays (Van Noort-van der Spek & Weisglas-Kuperus, 2012). Though standardized language tests offer useful information on language development, the analysis of a spontaneous language sample gives a better overall picture of a child’s expressive abilities (Grégoire, Rondal, & Pérée, 1984). Spontaneous language samples of school-aged children (M = 9;1) born prematurely (n = 26) were collected and analyzed using SALT software. Analyses included lexical, syntactic and morphosyntactic errors made in conversation. The data was then compared to a sample of children born at term. Results of these analyses will be presented, thereby increasing our knowledge of the language trajectory of children born prematurely.


The Experience of French Immersion in Three Canadian Cities

Authors: Rebecca MacDonald, M.Sc. Candidate, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS; Ariane Tye, M.Sc. Candidate, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS; Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird, PhD, S-LP(C), Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS; Janani Selvachandran, PhD Candidate, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON; Becky Chen-Bumgardner, PhD, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON; Ann Sutton, PhD, S-LP(C), University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON

Topic for: Audiologists, Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Introductory

Age Group: School Aged, Adult

Presented by: Rebecca MacDonald, M.Sc. Candidate

French Immersion is an educational program that has been successful in increasing bilingualism in Canada. However, questions remain about reasons for enrolment, attrition and long-term benefits. This study used focus groups to explore the experiences of undergraduate university students in Halifax, Toronto and Ottawa who had attended French Immersion. Analysis revealed that participants enjoyed French Immersion, but they often lacked confidence in their French skills and authentic opportunities to use French after immersion varied. Participants also revealed that they had no exposure to students with special needs in French Immersion.


Un indice de complexité articulatoire peut-il prédire la performance des enfants ?

Auteures : Marianne Paul, Ph. D., Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, QC; Stéphanie De Serres, orthophoniste

Sujet(s) : Orthophonie, Aides en santé de la communication

Niveau : Intermédiaire

Groupe d’âge : Enfant d’âge préscolaire

Présenté par : Marianne Paul, Ph. D.

Afin de contrôler la difficulté articulatoire d’items langagiers, il faut une mesure permettant de prédire la justesse articulatoire. L’indice de complexité phonologique non-linéaire (I-NL) a été créé afin de considérer les éléments suprasegmentaux dans la détermination du niveau de difficulté. Cet indice est mis à l’essai avec la performance d’enfants de 3 ans aux items du Test Francophone de Phonologie, version b (TFPb) (Paul, 2009), classés en catégories de complexité selon l’I-NL et selon la longueur moyenne des énoncés phonologiques. Les résultats indiquent que l’I-NL est prometteur.


Verb Fast Mapping and Imitation in Children with Down Syndrome

Authors: Eleanor Campbell, B.A., M.Sc. Candidate, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS; Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird, PhD, S-LP(C), Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: Pre-School, School Aged, Adult

Presented by: Eleanor Campbell, BA, M.Sc. Candidate

Children with Down syndrome (DS) have trouble fast mapping (FM) novel verbs compared to mental age matched typically developing (TD) peers. Noun imitation aids FM, but no research exists for verbs. 16 TD children and 16 children with DS will complete a FM task of eight novel verbs and will be tested on comprehension and production of the words immediately and after delay. Hypotheses include better performance in the imitation condition, better performance on immediate probes and poorer overall performance for children with DS. Preliminary results confirm the hypothesis, with the exception the TD participant performing worse in the imitation condition.


Weekend Camps for Communication Disorders: Student, Client and Family Outcomes

Authors: Esther Kim, PhD, R.SLP, CCC-SLP, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB; Karen Pollock, PhD, R.SLP, CCC-SLP, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB; Wendy Quach, PhD, R.SLP, CCC-SLP, University of Alberta/San Jose State University, Edmonton, AB; Andrea Ruelling, MA, R.SLP, CCC-SLP, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB; Kim Adams, PhD, P.Eng, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: School Aged, Adult, Senior

Presented by: Esther Kim, PhD, R.SLP, CCC-SLP

Weekend camps for individuals with communication disorders provide opportunities for therapeutic, recreational and social engagement for clients and family members. They also provide opportunities for pre-service students from rehabilitation disciplines to gain valuable hands-on experience supporting functional communication in naturalistic social contexts. This poster will describe the development and implementation of the Alberta Aphasia Camp and AAC Camp Alberta and will provide a summary of the many positive outcomes for campers, families and students.


Word-Finding in Storytelling: A Pilot Study of Typically Developing Children

Authors: Vincent Bourassa Bédard, PhD Candidate, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC; Natacha Trudeau, PhD, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Introductory

Age Group: School Aged

Presented by: Vincent Bourassa Bédard, PhD Candidate

The goal of this study was to adapt German’s (1991) analysis from the Test of Word Finding in Discourse for use in a storytelling setting with typically developing French-speaking children aged 7 years to 8 years and 11 months. Preliminary analysis of three participants revealed that children did not produce delays, insertions, substitutions or interjections as defined by German. The presence of these behaviours in storytelling could potentially constitute red flags in the identification of word-finding difficulties. Moreover, the thresholds for delays and interjections suggested by German may need to be revised. Future steps will be discussed.


Written Syntactic Competencies from Elementary to Post-Secondary Level Students

Authors: Michèle Minor-Corriveau, PhD, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Béatrice Pothier, PhD; Dakota Beaulieu, M.Sc.S, Health Science North, Sudbury, ON; Carly Belanger, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON; Danica Berthiaume, B.H.Sc., Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON

Topic for: Speech-Language Pathologists

Level: Intermediate

Age Group: School Aged

Presented by: Michèle Minor-Corriveau, PhD

Speech-language pathologists in Ontario are mandated by CASLPO (2016) and supported by literature published by SAC (2014) and ASHA (2016) to assess, treat and prevent written language difficulties. That said, more than half of the syntactic skills required to achieve written language proficiency are not mastered by 75% of Grade 7 students in Canada. This study aims to establish the hierarchy of syntactic skills for students in grades 2, 5, 7, 9 as well as post-secondary level students enrolled in French-language schools in Canada where L1 is English and L2 is French.