SAC Online Workshop: Advanced Literacy Practices – Making it Happen!

Presented By Jana Leggett, MHSc. Reg. CASLPO; Sherry Raffalovitch, MHSc, Reg. CASLPO

Overview

The 2024 course registration is now closed.

This University of Toronto accredited course provides Speech-Language Pathologists (S-LPs) with the unique opportunity to connect with S-LPs from across Canada to co-learn together while sharing their perspectives, ideas, practices, and experiences on various topics in the multidisciplinary field of literacy.

This 6-month-long course will consist of:
  • 12, 3-hour long on-line sessions,
  • 1 Independent-Study Module,
  • 4 Application to Practice Modules*.

* The Application to Practice Modules consist of completing a full language and literacy assessment in two parts on a selected Grade 1 or above student and planning and completing a minimum of 4 intervention sessions.

 

Intended audience:
  • Speech-Language Pathologists
Location:
  • Virtual

The course will describe contemporary and advanced, evidence-based approaches to assessment and intervention in emergent literacy, reading, and writing disorders across populations. Culturally relevant and responsive practices will be discussed throughout the course. The on-line session learning will involve interactive lectures interspersed with small group case-study discussions, problem solving, and sharing by learners.

Evaluation will consist of:

  • 1 research-to-practice reflection (1 page in length)
  • 2 assessment summaries (1 page in length each)
  • 2 intervention summaries (1 page in length each)
  • brief learning reflections completed at the end of each module and 1 final learning reflection completed at the end of the course.

 

To say that this was the best course I have ever taken would be an understatement! Overall, I found so much of the information within the course relevant and applicable to my current work. I think it made me want to learn even more about so many things. I continue to look back at my notes and consider different pieces as I am seeing different students for assessments.”

Ashleigh Molilnaro, Speech-Language Pathologist

 

During the Independent-Learning Module, participants will be given time to review and reflect on assigned readings and relate them to their current practice.

In the Application to Practice Modules, learners will be given time to apply their learning to their practice as they conduct assessments, develop intervention plans, and complete intervention sessions. The participants will deliver a minimum of four intervention sessions tracking student progress and adjusting their session plans in response to their student’s strengths and needs.

After each lecture, learners will be asked to review their lecture notes along with the assigned readings and complete a brief learning reflection (maximum 250 words in length).

 

I came into the course with a good stash of background knowledge and experience, but I am leaving with so much more. What has really changed, is the way that I look at and think about students’ literacy going forward. My big-picture thinking has changed and I am a better SLP because of it!!”

Sheri-Lee McGill, Speech-Language Pathologist

 

  • In addition to gaining a deeper knowledge about the science of reading, practical application assignments are included
  • Course facilitators provide real time, real life examples of how to share knowledge of the science of reading with educators
  • Session reflections are read and responded to in subsequent sessions so the course is responsive to participants needs and queries
  • Course facilitators provide office hours to support the completion of application assignments
  • Learning goes beyond the science of reading into how philosophies of differing professions use and interpret this information
  • Past participants often keep in touch with the facilitators and each other to continue their connections and professional collaborations
  • The course allows for both S-LPs who are new to the area of reading and those with experience to benefit
  • Now that this course is being offered across Canada it allows S-LPs from across the country to collaborate, share and discuss in a forum that is not available anywhere else.

 

 

Course Readings:
  • Readings will be provided during the course
Course Requirements:
  • In order to receive a Certificate of Course Completion all learners must:
    • Attend all sessions or provide a physician’s note for missing a lecture or an assignment due date
    • Come prepared to participate in large and small group discussions
    • Complete all assessments and interventions with a target student.
    • Participants must pass all 5 assignments described in this syllabus.
Course Prerequisites
  • Master’s degree (or equivalent) in Speech-Language Pathology
  • Good standing with their provincial/state regulatory body
  • Minimum of 2 years of practice with school-age children (i.e., age 5 to 18 years) with a variety of speech and language needs
  • Access to a grade 1 or older student with difficulties in emergent literacy, reading, and writing
  • Access to emergent literacy, reading, and writing assessment tools
  • Familiarity with the Ministry of Education’s curricular documents
CEEs:
  • This workshop is eligible for 51 SAC CEEs.

Instructors

Jana Leggett, MHSc

Jana is a speech-language pathologist with the Toronto District School Board (TDSB). She works directly with students completing language and literacy assessments and running intervention groups. Part of her role includes collaborative work with the TDSB’s Early Years Department in developing and delivering professional learning to system senior teams, school administrators, educators, and parents in the areas of language and literacy development, assessment, instruction, and intervention. Jana holds an appointment with the University of Toronto where she teaches an undergraduate course, Reading and Literacy Disorders, and co-teaches in a graduate course, School Age Language Intervention. She is the co-author of Oral Language at Your Finger Tips and the author and instructor of the Accredited Continued Education Course, Advanced Literacy Practices, for speech-language pathologists.

Sherry Raffalovitch, MHSc

Sherry Raffalovitch is a speech-language pathologist who is in her 21st year working for the Toronto District School Board (TDSB). Sherry has held several roles within the TDSB, including Kindergarten Early Language Intervention S-LP, consultant, summer school program designer and is currently one of the S-LPs assigned to the Early Literacy Intervention Team. Sherry has been a course facilitator for the Advanced Literacy Practices Course since it started.

Registration Fees

Early Bird

(December 12, 2023)

Regular
SAC / ASHA Members $1,599 $1,699
Non-Members $2,199 $2,299
Registration Deadline:
  • January 3, 2024
  • There is a maximum of 25 spots with each instructor.
SAC Members:
  • SAC members must sign in at the top of the registration page to receive the member rate.
ASHA members must:
  • ASHA members are required to provide proof of membership.
  • To ensure you receive the discounted ASHA rate, please email Bev Cooper prior to registering for more information.
10% Group Discount for Groups of Five or More:
  • Register five colleagues to attend the Advanced Literacy Practices: Making it Happen! 2024 virtual workshop and receive a 10% discount off the total cost of registration. To qualify for the discount, you must be from the same organization. Email Bev Cooper for details and to receive your promo code.
Cancellation Policy:
  • An administration fee of $75.00 will apply to all refunds.
  • Requests for refunds must be received by December 12, 2023.
  • No refunds after December 12, 2023.
  • Please email Bev Cooper to request a refund.
Objectives:

Speech-language pathologists will:

  1. Be able to utilize and apply their knowledge and understanding of the science of reading in their clinical work to improve assessment, goal selection and intervention in order to improve client outcomes.
  2. Understand the reciprocity that exists between oral and written language in order to better understand how various linguistic and literacy skills influence and impact each other.
  3. Apply advances in research-to-practice and culturally responsive literature to the assessment and intervention of language and literacy disorders.
  4. Develop integrative knowledge of evidence-based intervention practices that are explicit, systematic, and linked to the curriculum.
  5. Develop and apply critical thinking skills when selecting, evaluating, and interpreting assessment and intervention materials and tools.
  6. Apply their knowledge in authentic, job-embedded situations (i.e., assessment, intervention, consultation).
  7. Engage in reflective practice to evaluate and amend their learning as needed throughout the course.

 

Course Outline:

Note:  Each session consists of 3 hours of synchronous, on-line learning with one fifteen-minute break and 3-4 small group discussion opportunities.

Module 1: Building a Context for Practice in Literacy
  • This session will focus on expanding the participants’ understanding of what is meant by literacy and the societal impact of poor literacy and illiteracy.
  • Participants will explore Canadian statistics to learn more about the literacy rates of Canadian adults and students of all ages.
  • The field of literacy is multidisciplinary. The role of a speech-language pathologist in literacy will be reviewed.
  • Learning theories in the context of multidisciplinary collaborations and their implications for practice will be discussed and applied to a case study.
Cohort 1:

  • Tuesday, Jan 9
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET
Cohort 2:

  • Thursday, Jan 11
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET

Module 2: The Reading Wars and Literacy Frameworks
  • How should students be taught to read? The Reading Wars have been raging for over 30 years. Is it possible to find a common ground? The history of the Reading Wars will be briefly reviewed through the lens of the most current research.
  • Having access to a literacy framework that informs assessment, intervention and differential diagnosis is critical to guide clinical work. Through large and small group discussions, several literacy frameworks and their implications for practice will be discussed.
Cohort 1:

  • Tuesday, Jan 16
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET
Cohort 2:

  • Thursday, Jan 18
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET

Independent-Study Module Week of January 22nd
  • Participants engage in independent learning to gain a deeper understanding of various literacy frameworks and how they might inform one’s practice.
  • Learner’s Participation in this self-study module will be evaluated through a written reflection submitted to the course instructor.

Module 3: Moving from Phonological Recoding to Orthographic Mapping
  • This session will explore the research related to phonological and phonemic awareness. Predictors of reading challenges will be discussed.
  • The reciprocity between phonological, orthographic, and semantic knowledge will be discussed.
  • Participants will also be given opportunities to discuss and work on case studies related to varied populations (e.g., students with dyslexia, students with ASD, students with developmental delays, and emergent bilinguals).
Cohort 1:

  • Tuesday, Jan 30
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET
Cohort 2:

  • Thursday, Feb 1
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET

Module 4: Exploring Morphological Awareness and Reading of Multisyllabic Words
  • The role of morphology in reading and writing will be discussed in detail.
  • Participants will take part in a simulation to gain insight into the experiences of student who struggles with decoding. Implications for practice will be discussed in small groups.
  • Various tools of decoding as well as oral language (e.g., expressive semantics, language sample) will be reviewed during this session by the participants. Pros and cons of the selected tools will be discussed in small groups.
  • Participants will have an opportunity to apply their learning by interpreting sample assessments.
Cohort 1:

  • Tuesday, Feb 6
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET
Cohort 2:

  • Thursday, Feb 8
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET

Module 5: What does the research say about decoding and encoding assessment?
  • Participants will practice analyzing and evaluating various assessment tools to identify their potential strengths and weaknesses in order to better inform their interpretation of results, goal selection, and session planning.
  • Alternative measures to standardized assessments will be discussed.
Cohort 1:

  • Tuesday, Feb 13
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET
Cohort 2:

  • Thursday, Feb 15
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET

Application and Implementation Module: Feb 19th – March 1st
  • There will be no in-class sessions. Participants will be asked to complete decoding and encoding assessments with their students.
  • Learner’s Participation in this Application to Practice Module will be evaluated through a 1-page, written reflection

Module 6: What does the research say about decoding and encoding intervention?
  • Intervention research as it relates to word reading and spelling will be discussed and participants will have an opportunity to practice goal setting and intervention application using case studies.
Cohort 1:

  • Tuesday, March 5
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET
Cohort 2:

  • Thursday, March 7
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET

March Break – Week of March 11th
  • There will be no in-class sessions.

Module 7: Decoding and encoding intervention continued
  • This module is a continuation of Module 6 with more discussion of intervention related to reading and spelling words. Participants will engage in practice to try out various strategies and approaches to literacy intervention. In small groups, participants will discuss, interpret results, plan sessions and have an opportunity to learn from each other.
Cohort 1:

  • Tuesday, March 19
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET
Cohort 2:

  • Thursday, March 21
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET

Application to Practice Module: Mar 25th – April 5th
  • Participants will be given time to plan and carry out decoding/encoding intervention sessions.
  • Learner’s Participation in this Application to Practice Module will be evaluated through a 1-page written reflection documenting their observations and learning.

Module 8: How does high quality lexical knowledge support literacy development?
  • Having covered word reading and spelling, this session is the introduction to reading comprehension and written expression beyond the level of the word. The role of semantics in academic success will be discussed in detail. Participants will engage in collaborative discussions relating to the depth of vocabulary development and how to support the development of high-quality lexical knowledge.
Cohort 1:

  • Tuesday, April 9
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET
Cohort 2:

  • Thursday, April 11
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET

Module 9: How does morphosyntax support the development of literacy?
  • This session will review the latest research relating to morphosyntax and literacy development. Participants will engage in collaborative discussion to translate research to their practice. Case studies and personal experiences will be reviewed, discussed and shared.
Cohort 1:

  • Tuesday, April 16
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET
Cohort 2:

  • Thursday, April 18
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET

Module 10: What do I need to know about reading comprehension and written expression assessments? 
  • This session will discuss considerations relating to the assessment of reading comprehension and written expression.
  • Culturally relevant practices and considerations for English language learners will be discussed.
  • Participants will have an opportunity to plan further assessment of their student.
Cohort 1:

  • Tuesday, April 23
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET
Cohort 2:

  • Thursday, April 25
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET

Application To Practice Module: April 29th – May 10th
  • There will be no in-class sessions. Participants will be given time to complete RC and WC assessments with their student.
  • Learner’s Participation in this Application to Practice Module will be evaluated through a 1-page written reflection documenting their observations and learning.

Module 11: What does the research say about reading comprehension and written language intervention?
  • Intervention research as it relates to reading comprehension and written expression will be discussed. Participants will have an opportunity to practice goal setting and intervention application using case studies.
  • Participants will be provided with an opportunity to include reading comprehension and written expression into their intervention sessions with their target student.
Cohort 1:

  • Tuesday, May 14
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET
Cohort 2:

  • Thursday, May 16
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET

Application to Practice Module: May 20th – May 31st
  • Participants will be given time to carry out RC/WC intervention sessions.
  • Learner’s Participation in this Application to Practice Module will be evaluated through a written reflection submitted to the course instructor documenting their observations and learning.

Module 12: Aligning current, cross-disciplinary literacy research with practice
  • Critical research from the fields of cognitive neuroscience, neuropsychology, special education and genetics will be reviewed. Throughout the session, participants will work in small groups to integrate the presented research and theories with their practice-based knowledge and relate the consolidated information to various curricular expectations.
Cohort 1:

  • Tuesday, June 4
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET
Cohort 2:

  • Thursday, June 6
  • 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET

Final Course Reflection due June 20th

Graduation
  • June 25, 2024
  • Time TBA
  • Cohort 1 & 2

 

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