Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI)

New Report: Canada's Child Hearing Health Programs Still Far Behind

 

On January 18, 2016, the Canadian Infant Hearing Task Force (CIHTF) released a new progress report on the state of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs in Canada. The EHDI Progress Report is an interim status update on the EHDI Report Card, which the task force released in 2014. The CIHTF — a collaboration between SAC and the Canadian Academy of Audiology (CAA) — has also released its first official EHDI Position Statement.

 

READ THE 2016 EHDI PROGRESS REPORT READ THE EHDI POSITION STATEMENT READ THE 2014 EHDI REPORT CARD
2016 EHDI Progress Report EHDI Position Statement 2014 EHDI Report Card

 

Overall, the progress report provides a disappointing picture of the state of provincial and territorial EHDI programs. While a handful of provinces have taken steps in the right direction, there are still far too many regions lacking adequate early hearing health programs. SAC is calling on federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together to ensure that every child in Canada has access to excellent EHDI programs and services. The status quo must change.

 

Reaching Out to Health Ministers

SAC and the CIHTF sent advance copies of the EHDI Progress Report to all provincial and territorial health ministers one week prior to the official release, along with targeted letters that urge leaders to address specific issues in each region. We also sent a similar package to federal Health Minister Dr. Jane Philpott. Click on the links below to read each letter.

CIHTF logo

Visit the Canadian Infant Hearing Task Force (CIHTF) website

 

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About EHDI

2016 Media Coverage

2014 Media and Advocacy

2010 Media Coverage

Resources and More Information

 

About EHDI

Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) refers to programs that include all aspects of screening infants for hearing loss, identifying hearing loss in infants referred from screening and intervention services for infants found to have hearing deficits. An EHDI program is more comprehensive than a universal newborn hearing screening program (see below).

Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS) refers to programs designed to screen infants for hearing loss. A UNHS program is the first step in an EHDI program and does not typically include the necessary next steps related to diagnosis and intervention.

 

READ THE EHDI INFO SHEET

EHDI Info Sheet

 

2016 Media Coverage

Read the press release here.

Click the links below to see media coverage from 2016.

 

2014 Media and Advocacy

In 2014, SAC released a report card on the State of EHDI Programs in Canada at a national press conference on Parliament Hill.

Read the 2014 press release.

The report card was developed by SAC and the Canadian Academy of Audiology (collectively operating as the CIHTF). It was endorsed by the Canadian Paediatric Society, the Elks and Royal Purple of Canada and VOICE for Hearing Impaired Children. The purpose of the press conference was not only to launch the report card, but also urge the federal government to take a leadership role and work with provinces and territories to implement comprehensive EHDI programs across the country. SAC believes this is a national issue: every child in Canada should have access to an excellent EHDI program, regardless of where they live. 

Click the links below to see media coverage from 2014.

 

2010 Media Coverage 

Click the links below to see media coverage from 2010.

 

Resources and More Information

Wondering what hearing screening looks like? Here are some photos:

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hearing screening photo hearing screening photo hearing screening photo